Ida Naughton

<inaughto (at) ucsd (dot) edu>

As a second year PhD student, Ida is investigating the ways in which communities reassemble in the face of ecological disturbance. Ida is using an ongoing Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) eradication program on Santa Cruz Island, California as an arena to measure both structural and functional components of native ant resiliency to Argentine ant removal. Ida is also interested generally in southern California regional ant diversity. She is currently examining patterns of evolutionary diversification of carpenter ants (genus: Camponotus) on the California Channel Islands using phylogenetics, as well as inventorying ant species associated with the archipelago.

Ida’s previous projects include using nitrogen isotopes to examine ant-aphid interactions on non-native fennel, studying the impacts of the Argentine ant on island morning glory (Calystegia macrostegia), and inventorying arthropods associated with island scrub oak (Quercus pacifica) habitats. During her undergraduate career, Ida conducted a study of the phylogeography of Aphaenogaster occidentalis (family: Formicidae) across the west coast using DNA barcoding and worked on a study of the competitive impacts of yellowjackets (Vespula pennsylvanica) on plant pollinator mutualisms on the big island of Hawai’i.


Publications

Hanna, C., I. Naughton, C. Boser, and D.A. Holway. 2015. Testing the effects of ant invasions on non-ant arthropods with high-resolution taxonomic data. Ecological Applications 25:1841–1850.

Hanna, C., I. Naughton, C. Boser, R. Alarcón, K.L.J. Hung and D.A. Holway. 2015. Floral visitation by the Argentine ant reduces bee visitation and plant seed set. Ecology 96:222–230.

Naughton, I., M. Caterino, C. Hanna, and D.A. Holway. 2014. Contributions to an arthropod inventory of Santa Cruz Island, California. Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist 7:297–305.


Grants and Awards

National Institute of Health CMG Training Grant (2015)
Jeanne Marie Messier Grant (2015)
Southern California Learning Research Center Grant (2014)
The Nature Conservancy Graduate Fellowship (2014)